Underutilized Fish – Dogfish Shark

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Sustainable fishing is recognizing the limits of the environment and adhering to the changes and adaptation of an ecosystem. Listening to these changes and maintaining a healthy relationship with the Gulf of Maine includes celebrating different types of underutilized fish. Eating with the Ecosystem is a non-profit that helps us promote healthy habits, flourishing food webs, and adaptive supply chains. Our mission is to uphold this philosophy and reach consumers who are willing to adapt with and for the ecosystem. One of those underutilized being Dogfish.
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Dogfish are a family of shark that is beyond plentiful off our coast. They are most commonly shipped to Europe for England’s infamous fish and chips and therefore vastly unseen in local fish markets.  Dogfish are meatier, white fillet and hold up great when fried, baked, or in a chowder.  Restaurants that serve it around town, suggest soaking it in milk for a minimum of 15 minutes before preparing it to help tenderize the meat or throw it on the grill with some marinade.  Dan Hayes, a credited seafood chef in London, campaigns for the unloved fish, hoping to demonstrate how tasty Dogfish truly is. 
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Heather Atwood, a columnist who writes “Food For Thought” for The Gloucester Daily Times and North of Boston Media Group, recognizes Dogfish as being Marine Stewardship Council Certified or having three qualifications: being a part of sustainable fishing stocks, minimizing environmental impact and having effective management. She makes Cornmeal Crusted – Beer Battered Dogfish. Or try grilling Dogfish with caponata!
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Have your own fish recipes? Share them with us and be featured!

How to cook with Dogfish

Why Dogfish? 22 News explains

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Meet Our Fish

Sustainable fishing is recognizing the limits of the environment and adhering to the changes and adaptation of an ecosystem. Listening to these changes and maintaining a healthy relationship with the Gulf of Maine includes celebrating different types of underutilized fish. Eating with the Ecosystem is a non-profit that helps us promote healthy habits, flourishing food webs, and adaptive supply chains. Our mission is to uphold this philosophy and reach consumers who are willing to adapt with and for the ecosystem. One of those underutilized being Dogfish, also known as Cape Shark.

Cape Shark

Meatier, white fillet and hold up great when fried, baked, or in a chowder.  Restaurants that serve it around town, suggest soaking it in milk for a minimum of 15 minutes before preparing it to help tenderize the meat or throw it on the grill with some marinade.  Dan Hayes, a credited seafood chef in London, campaigns for the unloved fish, hoping to demonstrate how tasty Dogfish truly is.

Atlantic Pollock

a beautiful, sustainable fish with a firm texture and low oil content. Low in saturated fat, Pollock is a great source of protein and vitamin B12. Because Pollock yields such a high-quality fillet, it is often miss-labeled as Haddock–especially in fish sticks and fish and chips. It is also very popular in the fast food industry. Don’t let that fool you though–when fresh off the boat, its taste and texture rival any fish in the sea. It is exceptionally great for frying because of its firm flaky texture. Try Garlic Butter Poached Pollock!

Haddock

One of New England’s more commonly known fish. A cousin to the cod, haddock’s meat is white, with a slightly sweet taste and a flaky consistency. The flesh is firm and tender and can be cooked in a variety of ways, including in soups and chowders. Migrating seasonally, Haddock is most abundant in the summer in the waters of the Gulf of Maine. Try baking Haddock with a Ritz cracker topping or making Haddock Chowder!

Winter Flounder

Got their name because of their migrations-in winter.
Adults migrate from offshore areas towards bays and estuaries, where they spawn. As a flatfish, Winter Flounder are popular for their lean meat, sweet taste, and firm texture.
Try these recipes!
Sauteed Flounder with seasoned brown butter 
Grilled Flounder quick & easy

Acadian Redfish

Sustainably managed and responsibly harvested, Acadian Redfish is a deep-water fish that lives in a rocky, mud or clay bottom habitat. Popular in fish tacos, it is a low cholesterol white fish with a moist and flaky texture and a distinct and sweet taste. Acadian Redfish is commonly used in fish tacos. Try sauteeing it with pistachio and orange pesto. Or broil it with cilantro lime butter.

White Hake

A slender fillet, fresh White Hake has an off-white color that turns white when cooked. Often compared with Atlantic Cod, they have a mild flavor and a softer texture (read the full culinary profile). Try it Pan-Fried with Garlic and Pepper, or with Saffron and Orange sauce! Hake can also be baked in the oven.

King Whiting

Whiting, also known as Silver Hake, have softer flesh and are less flaky than other white fish such as Cod, Haddock, and Pollock. Mild and slightly sweet, the raw flesh is white to off-white, with a coarse, watery appearance. Hake can be substituted for many dishes calling for Pollock or Cod. Corned Hake is a popular recipe in New England, or try it pan-fried Portuguese-style!

Monkfish

“Monkfish aren’t the prettiest fish in the North Atlantic, having an enormous spiny head, tiny eyes and fang-like teeth. Indeed, the fish is better known for its flavour than appearance…” [This Fish]

Atlantic Cod

“An icon of the North Atlantic, cod has been fished for more than 500 years, ever since the discovery of the New World. The fish lives in colder waters on both sides of the Atlantic and has been a traditional staple for Europeans and North Americans…” [This Fish]


Spring CSF Sign-Ups | Session starts April 17

Join Your Community

CSA(F) stands for community-supported agriculture, or, in our case, community-supported fisheries (CSF).

The Model

Pay for a season’s worth of food to become a member and receive local, quality produce, poultry and/or seafood.

What It Means

  • eating healthful foods and preparing them for your family
  • supporting local farmers/fishermen and women
  • being kind to our planet
  • learning something new
  • being adventurous in the kitchen, like trying underutilized fish in the name of sustainability

Getting food from a CSA(F) is different from going to a farmers market or using a grocery delivery service. As a CSA(F) member, you make a seasonal commitment to a small farmer/fisherman or woman in your area, and the produce/seafood is either delivered to your door or you pick it up at a local distribution center (We have Pick-Up Locations in NH, MA and ME). CSA(F) members take pleasure in knowing where and how their food is grown/caught and typically have an open line of communication with their farmer/fisherman or woman.

“Community-supported agriculture (fisheries) is all about relationships and feeding families,” said Simon Huntley, CEO of Small Farm Central, a company that provides marketing support for small farms and started CSA(F) Day. “CSA(F) farmers typically teach members what’s in season throughout the year, and help them appreciate and cook food to which they may not otherwise be exposed.”

According to Small Farm Central’s CSA Farming Annual Report, the most popular time to join a CSA each year is at the end of February. CSA Day serves to promote our local farmers and fishermen/women and support sustainable practices. Our sign-ups are happening now! If you like Seafood and want to support the families of our fishermen and women, check out WHAT WE OFFER this Spring!

Are you supporting local farmers? Take the test to find out.


SIGN UP FOR LOCAL SEAFOOD and use the tag #CSAday to help us spread the word!


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Dock to Dish – CSF SPRING SESSION

Spring 2018 Sign-UpsWhen you BECOME A MEMBER of our Community Supported Fishery (CSF), you get a weekly share of delicious, wild caught fish fillets and optional “Add-on” choices like fresh local scallops, oysters, and lobster. Pick-up your shares at a LOCATION closest to you. Flexible plan for holds during vacation time. Your weekly share will be the “Catch of the Week”. You will receive a weekly newsletter on Mondays telling you about your fish, recipe ideas, and the NH Fisherman who caught it! Starting April 17 and lasting 8, 16, or 32 weeks.

Gulf of Maine species:  Acadian Redfish, American Plaice, Cod, Haddock, Yellowtail Flounder, Winter Flounder, Atlantic Pollock, King Whiting, Monkfish, White Hake, Cusk, or Dogfish (Cape) Shark.

FISH ONLY or FISH & LOBSTER shares available


FISH RECOMMENDATIONS

2lb Share/Week– feeding 4+

1lb Share/Week– feeding 2

1/2lb Share/Week– feeding 1


LOBSTER RECOMMENDATIONS

Lobster shares depend on the size of Fish Shares:

2lb Fish share: 4 chix /share

1lb Fish share: 2 chix /share

1/2lb Fish share: 1 chix/share

Chix lobsters weigh between 1.1-1.2lbs. Lobsters come live and banded on claws. 


OPTIONS

April 17-June 9

April 17-August 4

April 17-December 1


 

BECOME AND MEMBER

 

OUR WICKED FISH, INC.

 

Our Wicked Fish - HakeEncouraging New England to learn about, share, and eat local seafood, Our Wicked Fish, Inc. acknowledges that most of the seafood in New England is imported product and wants to change that. Their goal is to EDUCATE, ENCOURAGE, BUILD and PARTICIPATE.

EDUCATE the community on where to buy local fish, how to cook fish, who serves local fish, which fish are in season and local events.

ENCOURAGE the use of underutilized fish, like Dogfish.

BUILD partnerships with other organizations and fisheries (that’s us!)

PARTICIPATE in seafood sustainability and research.


Check them out on Facebook!